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WELLNESS--One thing that I have learned with almost 50 years under my belt is that consistency is the key to living a more satisfying and successful life. I’ve also figured out that being consistent always wins over hard work. 

WELLNESS-Long gone are the days of our great grandparent’s food. In those times everything was organic and people lived off the land. The soil was rich in minerals and our produce was packed with vitamins and phytonutrients. Our food was pure and natural. 

WELLNESS--In his book “The Four Agreements” the author Don Miguel Ruiz speaks eloquently about one of those four agreements, which took me years to learn, do not take things personally. 

WELLNESS--Traveling by plane just isn’t as much fun as it used to be. The airports are packed, line-ups are long, and the whole experience is a bit tedious and nerve-wracking. 

WELLNESS--If you’re stressed out these days, it’s not surprising. Between natural disasters and potential man-made wars with North Korea there’s a lot to worry about. This incessant worry combined with redlining our bodies with work and other demands leaves little time for self-care. 

WELLNESS--Let’s start with what meditation isn’t.  There are so many myths around meditation that end up stopping people from even trying.  For starters, people always say, “I can’t stop my mind from working which prevents me from meditating.” The goal of meditation is not to stop the mind.  The mind will stop when we die, and not before that. 

WELLNESS--Plastics have been making the news again lately because Donald Trump's administration has ended a six year ban on selling bottled water at certain national parks. It is not news that plastics have been wreaking havoc on our environment and our bodies for years.

WELLNESS--With climate change on the rise, many of us are feeling the effects of brutal ongoing heat and humidity, and if one is not careful, heat stroke can ensue. 

The Mayo Clinic defines heat stroke as “a condition caused by your body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures. This most serious form of heat injury, heatstroke can occur if your body temperature rises to 104 F (40 C) or higher. 

Heatstroke requires emergency treatment. Untreated heatstroke can quickly damage your brain, heart, kidneys and muscles. The damage worsens the longer treatment is delayed, increasing your risk of serious complications or death.” Not drinking enough water or drinking alcohol are both high risk behaviors for heat stroke.  

While pets and the elderly are most at risk, it can also be dangerous for people who work outside or exercise in the heat. The risks are higher in high humidity because moist air traps dampness and heat in our bodies making our cooling systems less effective 

There are a number of ways to tell if someone is starting to feel heatstroke included slurred speech, elevated heart rate or vomiting. Headaches can also be an early indicator that the body is overheating and if the person has flushed skin or a rapid heart rate these are also warning signs that the person should stop the physical activity and get inside. 

If anyone has more than one of the symptoms above it is quite possible they need emergency health services. Call 911 immediately. If emergency services are delayed or unavailable it is important that the person is cooled by whatever means necessary until medical services arrive.  

If you suspect someone is experiencing heat stroke there are a few steps to take. If it’s safe to move them try to get them indoors in the air conditioning as soon as possible. Sometimes if someone faints or feels dizzy people will gather around them. Be sure to tell people to step back so the victim can breathe fresh air and not feel more suffocated and hot. Fan the person if you are outside and can’t get them to a cool place and apply ice or ice packs to the patient's armpits neck groin and back if possible. 

If you are indoors and the patient can be safely moved without risk of falling (dizziness and fainting are common with heat stroke) get them to cold bath or cold shower where they can sit in the tub and cool down safely. Stay close and be sure the victim does not fall over and hit their head. A tub full of icewater is also helpful until medical help arrives.

 

(Christian Cristiano is an acupuncturist in LA, TV host of Wellness for Realists and writes on wellness regularly for CityWatch. Christian can be reached at 310.909.6956 twitter: @CristianoWFR)

-cw

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