Fri04242015

Last updateThu, 23 Apr 2015 9pm

LOS ANGELES Friday, April 24th 2015 5:20

  • Issue: Bathing topless at Venice Beach

    Martha Groves

    Date: Apr 24, 2015

    Forty years ago, a cadre of Venice Beach sunbathers routinely basked in the altogether. 

    The Venice Neighborhood Council thinks the time is ripe to take a half-step back to that time of physical freedom. In a 12-2 vote Tuesday, the council said it "supports women being afforded the same rights as men to sunbathe topless." 

    There are so many more important things to be concerned about in Venice...this makes us look foolish. 

    The city and county of Los Angeles prohibit nude or topless sunbathing. But Melissa Diner, the Venice council community officer who sponsored the resolution, said the panel would draft letters to Councilman Mike Bonin, Mayor Eric Garcetti and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, which has jurisdiction over the beach, calling for Venice to be exempted.  (Read the rest.)  


Thu Apr 30, 2015 @11:30AM -
Town Hall: Raising the Minimum Wage
Fri May 01, 2015 @11:00AM - 02:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles Luncheon
Fri May 01, 2015 @12:00PM - 05:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles
Fri May 08, 2015 @ 8:00AM - 08:00PM
Greenlining Institute 22nd Annual Economic Summit in L.A. May 8
Wed May 13, 2015 @11:30AM -
Reflections on Leadership in the Museum World from an Outsider


Dr Oz digs in. I will not be silenced!

Puppy high for the day: Puppy battles doorstopper

 

 

 

 

  

 

 


Passing the Buck

The Buck Stops Here

Most men in the early west carried a jack knife made by the Buck Knife Company.  When playing poker, it was common to place one of these Buck Knives in front of the dealer so that everyone knew who he was.  When it was time for a new dealer, the deck of cards and the knife were given to the new dealer.  If this person didn't want to deal, he would "Pass the Buck" to the next player.  If that player accepted, then "the Buck stops here".

 


 

 

Prop 8’s Ted Olson on Ninth Circuit’s Favorable Ruling: “We’ll Oppose Supreme Court Review”

GAY MARRIAGE - On a media call Tuesday, Ted Olson, one of the lawyers who successfully argued the Prop 8 case at both the district court and appellate court levels, as well as AFER president Chad Griffin and attorney Theodore Boutrous, answered questions about the ruling in which the Ninth Circuit denied an en banc rehearing of decision striking down the law as unconstitutional. Asked about whether the current Prop 8 case would be consolidated with the DOMA Gill case that will be sent to the Supreme Court for possible review, Ted Olson said that it’s possible the cases could be heard “on the same docket” – that is, on the same day – but probably not consolidated as one case.

Ultimately, he conceded he doesn’t know the outcome of that situation, but it would be unlikely for the cases to be consolidated, given that one (the Prop 8 case) deals with the rights of gay and lesbian couples to get married in the first place, while the other (Gill) concerns the discrimination in federal rights and benefits suffered by legally-married couples under DOMA.

As Chris Geidner wrote Tuesday at Metro Weekly, Charles Cooper, the attorney for the proponents of Prop 8, has announced that he and his colleagues will be seeking Supreme Court review (in legal speak, they will technically file a petition seeking a “writ of certiorari,” also known as “cert”).  

Speaking to Metro Weekly, Cooper said: We’re pleased to petition the Court to hear this case. The lower court opinions were little more than an attack on the character and judgment of millions of Californians, and those decisions essentially ignored all relevant Supreme Court and appellate court precedent. We are hopeful and confident that the Supreme Court will review the 9th Circuit’s decision.

When asked how he and his colleagues plan to respond to the proponents’ certiorari petition, Olson told Metro Weekly pointedly, "We’ll oppose that.”

The Supreme Court, which generally recesses for the summer by late June, would then consider the petition after further briefing in support of and against a review is completed, likely once the justices return in the fall. By Supreme Court practice, four of the justices would need to vote to hear the case in order for the court to accept it.

Olson elaborated on he and his colleagues’ reasoning for opposing certiorari, saying that he and his fellow lawyers represent four individuals who wish to get married in California, but who face Proposition 8 as an obstacle. For the plaintiffs, overturning Proposition 8 is the desired victory and their lawyers have an obligation to pursue that goal as quickly and simply as possible.

Olson said that he would certainly look forward to an airing of all the issues surrounding this case and marriage equality in general at the Supreme Court, but that he feels an obligation to preserve the victory for his clients.

One interesting note about Olson’s comments is his elaboration on the reach of the narrowly-written Ninth Circuit opinion. He suggested that, in fact, the decision could actually reach further than that, even if the Supreme Court upholds it as written.

He said that it could affect states like North Carolina, that just passed Amendment 1, banning marriage for gays and lesbians as well as civil unions and domestic partnerships.  Of course, that issue would have to be taken up by other courts in the future, since it would be on a case-by-case and state-by-state basis.

Regardless, the Prop 8 decision is likely to have a major impact no matter which court ends up having the final say on the matter.  

California is, of course, the most populous state in the nation, and if marriage equality is restored to the state, the number of people living in states with full marriage rights would double to 1 out of every 5 Americans.  

If the Supreme Court decides not to take up the Prop 8 case, the Ninth Circuit’s ruling would become precedent in the largest judicial circuit in the U.S., and while it would not bring full marriage rights to the other states in the circuit, it could be cited persuasively in future LGBT litigation.  

And, of course, if the Supreme Court does take up the case, the effect could be even greater.  Either way, today’s news puts us one step closer to a major LGBT legal decision that will dramatically change the lives of many Americans.

(Scottie Thomaston and Jacob Combs are contributors to Courage Campaign Institute's Prop8TrialTracker.comwhere this piece was cross-posted.)
-cw

Tags: Prop 8, Ted Olson, Ninth Circuit, US Supreme Court








CityWatch
Vol 10 Issue 46
Pub: June 8, 2012  

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