Mon04272015

Last updateMon, 27 Apr 2015 9pm

LOS ANGELES Monday, April 27th 2015 10:17

  • Issue: LA City Workers Make Much More Than Private Sector

    Peter Jamison & Catherine Saillant

    Date: Apr 28, 2015 

    For almost a year, the labor groups representing roughly 20,000 Los Angeles city workers have battled at the bargaining table for people like Marshall Turner. 

    Turner supports his union. Yet when it comes to his job, he's not complaining. A 59-year-old garbage-truck driver, he made $95,696 last year including overtime. His three decades of city employment enabled him to buy a four-bedroom Rancho Cucamonga home and provide for five children. He recognizes his privileged place in an economy that has grown increasingly bleak for blue-collar workers. 

    "I feel blessed at the city of Los Angeles," he said recently over a ramen lunch during a break from collecting trash in South-Central. 

    That sense of satisfaction is not misplaced — at least not when it comes to his paycheck. Among the city workers who are currently threatening to strike amid contract negotiations that have stalled over pay and other issues, many collect salaries higher than those who do similar jobs in both the public and private sectors, a Los Angeles Times analysis has found.  (Read the rest.) 


Thu Apr 30, 2015 @11:30AM -
Town Hall: Raising the Minimum Wage
Fri May 01, 2015 @11:00AM - 02:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles Luncheon
Fri May 01, 2015 @12:00PM - 05:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles
Fri May 08, 2015 @ 8:00AM - 08:00PM
Greenlining Institute 22nd Annual Economic Summit in L.A. May 8
Wed May 13, 2015 @11:30AM -
Reflections on Leadership in the Museum World from an Outsider


Amazing! 500 years of NYC … in 60 seconds

LA Watchdog Jack Humphreville guesting on LA Roundtable … Making a Difference

‘Infinity’ folks … Mariah Carey’s latest

 

 

 

 

  

 

 


Passing the Buck

The Buck Stops Here

Most men in the early west carried a jack knife made by the Buck Knife Company.  When playing poker, it was common to place one of these Buck Knives in front of the dealer so that everyone knew who he was.  When it was time for a new dealer, the deck of cards and the knife were given to the new dealer.  If this person didn't want to deal, he would "Pass the Buck" to the next player.  If that player accepted, then "the Buck stops here".

 


 

 

For South LA the Community Care Facilities Ordinance is Housing Apartheid

URBAN PERSPECTIVE - I had made promises all over that I would not write another article about the Community Care Facilities Ordinance. Sorry! I can’t make good on this promise because it is one of the most important ordinances that will affect South Los Angeles and people of color communities.

South LA has been through a lot this past year. We’ve had to fight injustices in transportation with the Crenshaw line. We’ve had to suffer from the redlining of Council District 8 and 9 from economic assets. Sadly, we’ve had even more people become poorer and marginalized from employment opportunities. Now, we are battling housing apartheid.

This ordinance is once again bad housing policy, especially for South LA where there are high concentrations of homelessness, people exiting incarceration and child welfare institutions, veterans, and seniors. It’s a potential segregation system instrument for housing containment.

We are all too familiar with the ghettoizing of our community through land use and zoning. With this ordinance, there is the possibility of steering vulnerable populations who need shared housing to R3 and R4 zones. By doing so, this may cause de facto concentrations of poverty and limited social and economic diversity.

What will this mean? It will mean concentrated poverty in R3 and above zones and neighborhood breakdown in economically volatile communities. There will be no equal employment or educational opportunities. Those areas will be subordinated to low purchasing power which will send messages to potential outside markets about investing. And, there will be decreased demand causing disinvestment to ensue.

Is this Apartheid? Yes it is because this ordinance is saying that vulnerable populations don’t belong in R1 and R2 zones with intentions of placing them elsewhere.

There is no hope in concentrated poverty. The best way to avert it is by immersing vulnerable populations in economically diverse neighborhoods. They get to model good neighbor citizenry and experience a better quality of life.

The fact that this ordinance has polarized neighborhood councils and block clubs shows how problematic it is. Agreeably, we want neighborhoods free of nuisance homes, but can’t agree on the best way to do it.

For those who think their neighborhoods are on the “tipping” point and see the Community Care Facilities Ordinance as a better than nothing solution to improve neighborhood quality, it is not. Much has already been written about it to demonstrate why. What you should know is that it doesn’t bring accountability or nuisance abatement enforcement that we need.

Think about it. How difficult is it to get a stay away order for prostitution in front of a school? What about shutting down problem liquor stores or pulling their licenses? Don’t forget the sleazy motels that allow human trafficking or sexual exploitation of youth. Or landlords of commercial buildings who have unruly parties that result in violence. It’s hard to get the city or our local officials to do something.

There is one permeating theme as it relates to the Community Care Facilities Ordinance. That is how to get Building and Safety or other city enforcement departments to do their job of abating nuisances.

How can we receive a complaint acknowledgement and streamlined process for abatement? Who will be responsible and how long will it take? What will be the abatement outcome? And so on.

As the saying goes, “the road to hell is paved with good intentions.” For the Community Care Facilities Ordinance, I hope housing apartheid isn’t the hell of it.

(Janet Denise Kelly is a CityWatch featured contributor. She offers more than a decade of accomplishments in the housing and nonprofit sector. Janet brings valuable insight in the areas of community and economic development. Additionally, she brings knowledge regarding the leadership and management challenges faced by large and small nonprofits that are struggling or growing organizations. She blogs at jdkellyenterprises.org and can be reached at: janetdkelly@yahoo.com) –cw

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CityWatch
Vol 10 Issue 57
Pub: July 17, 2012

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