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 IF IT'S BROKEN...FIX IT

Getting Serious about LA’s Sidewalk Repairs: A Five-Point ‘Let’s-Get-On-with-It’ Plan

Ken Alpern
FIXING LA-Last Tuesday night's City Council Board of Public Works and Budget Committees met and allowed a lot of good public input to a series of concerned and available Councilmembers and City officials. The attendance and input were both outstanding--I want to thank Councilmember Mike Bonin, in particular, for allowing the outreach and advice to…

Latino Politicians Putting Climate Change Ahead of Constituents

Joel Kotkin
POLITICS-Racial and economic inequality may be key issues facing America today, but the steps often pushed by progressives, including minority politicians, seem more likely to exacerbate these divisions than repair them. In a broad arc of policies affecting everything from housing to employment, the agenda being adopted serves to stunt upward…

Worlds Apart on Kathryn Steinle: When Political Opportunism Reigns Supreme

John Mirisch
MUSING WITH MIRISCH-The small Swedish Jewish Museum in Stockholm is tucked away on a side street. Discreet signage instructs would-be visitors to push a button which activates a camera, so they can be screened before they are granted entry. The museum's permanent exhibition fills one fairly small room. Most of the objects on display are Jewish…

Garcetti Passes, Wesson Fails

Jack Humphreville
LA WATCHDOG-Our Los Angeles Times has issued midterm letter grades for Controller Ron Galperin (B-) and City Attorney Mike Feuer (B+) and will be posting grades for City Council President Herb Wesson this Sunday and Mayor Eric Garcetti the following Sunday. Our City is facing many difficult issues, ranging from a lagging economy, relatively high…

What LA Really Needs: A Part-time City Council and a Part-time Mayor!

Dennis Zine
JUST THE FACTS-There are so many serious and pressing problems facing the City of Los Angeles and few if any real solutions are being proposed or implemented by our elected and appointed leaders at City Hall. I will start with the current city budget. Former Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa had a $7.7 billion total budget in the 2013-2014 fiscal year.…

Why Don’t the City’s Women Managers Hire More Women?

Denyse Selesnick
MY TURN-Perusing the web is a little like the soap operas of yesteryear. You get suckered in! One link leads to another link and then one is exposed to a barrage both facts and idiocy. The reason for this discussion was my attending a July Valley Alliance of Neighborhood Councils (VANC) meeting with the Department of Water and Power. General…

Cleaning Up LA City Hall: ‘It’s What’s Legal That’s the Problem’

Bob Gelfand
GELFAND’S WORLD-Everyone understands that developers own our city government. Sure, there are some officials here and there who are upright and independent, but recent history shows that the developers typically get their way in spite of public opposition. Whether it is a zoning change for an office tower or the required permits for a new mall,…

Not So Fast LA! Let’s Consider the Real Costs of Hosting the Olympics before We Jump In

Greg Nelson
SPORTS POLITICS-On Monday, Boston withdrew from its offer to be the nation’s bidder for the 2024 Summer Olympic Games. In January, Los Angeles finished second to Boston when the U.S. Olympic Committee made its decision. After Boston was selected to polish up its bid before submitting it to the International Olympic Committee for a final decision,…

Party Crashing for Political Access: Schwarzenegger and My Pantsuit

Charlotte Laws
CALIFORNIA ACCESS POLITICS-Party crashing—or gate-crashing, as it is sometimes called—is an art form that I stumbled upon as a teen. I taught myself how to finagle into any event, anywhere, anytime. It required being part private eye, part actress and part chutzpah machine. I had to think outside of the box, throw myself into the role, and whip my…

 

Reynolds Rap Video: Joey has hope for the pope in Philly.





Art or Ad? LA’s mural law written in gray ink

Escape the Room-Conan goes for the record … and the laffs


LADWP Rates Overview

 

 

  

 

 

 

Veterans: The War After The War

AFTER-WAR POLITICS - Now that the last American combat soldier has walked across the desert out of Iraq, and the Obama administration seems poised to end our military involvement in Afghanistan over howls from the military’s brass and war machine manufacturers, the question returns: What now for the men and women who fought those wars in our name?
Older combat veterans know, and younger veterans and their loved ones are finding out, that the battle for how to live out the rest of your life begins after you’ve come home and taken off your uniform for the last time, with your wounds, memories of your fallen comrades, and the agitation that makes a full night’s sleep difficult without drink or drug long after the last firefight.

So the veterans who gathered at the California Democratic Party‘s [link] Veterans Caucus meeting last week in San Diego were eager to find out what California’s political leaders might do about the alarming rates of homelessness, unemployment, suicide, and disability among the state’s veterans.

LA’s the Homeless Capital for Veterans, Too-“We have unprecedented levels of homeless veterans in California,” acknowledged California State Assembly Speaker John Perez, who convened the Democratic Party’s meeting and who represents an impoverished district near downtown Los Angeles. “My district has among the highest levels of homelessness in California.”

Nationwide, an estimated 76,000 veterans are homeless on a given night, with 130,000 spending at least one night in a homeless shelter, a growing number of them women veterans, according to David Zucchino of the Los Angeles Times:

“Veterans make up 8% of the U.S. population, but almost 16% of homeless adults. Half of all homeless veterans suffer from mental illness, and two-thirds are substance abusers.”

In Los Angeles County, about 7,400 veterans are homeless, [link] including “about 1,415 veterans considered to be chronically homeless, meaning they have been homeless for at least a year and suffer from a serious health issue, mental illness or addiction.”

In San Diego County, home to a huge US Navy presence and just down the road from the Marine Corps Camp Pendleton, 35%, or 3,000, of the county’s 8,500 homeless are veterans.  [link]

Speaker Perez announced that the Assembly has taken $2 million out of its operating budget to help returning veterans, especially those from the California National Guard, admittedly a drop in the bucket with so many veterans living on our streets.

“We’re also integrating discussions about veteran homelessness and what to do about it in all our committees, not just the Veterans Committee,” continued Perez, who had been invited by Caucus Chair Rick Reyes to keynote the meeting. “Those dealing with housing, education, and labor need to be part of the conversation, too.”

Developing LA’s National Home for Veterans-During the Veterans Caucus meeting, Joe Halper of the Pacific Palisades Democratic Club presented a resolution calling for the Department of Veterans Affairs to devote its 387-acre compound in West Los Angeles for its intended purpose of serving disabled veterans, which might then put a dent in the County’s homeless veterans property. The resolution was overwhelming approved and quickly gathered endorsements by a number of elected Democrats representing West LA.

The resolution attempts to resolve an ongoing battle to return the sprawling hospital campus and renovate its dilapidated buildings for their originally intended use of rehabilitating and housing veterans, rather than being leased for use as “a public golf course, [link] a college baseball stadium, a theatre and practice fields for the exclusive private Brentwood School.”At one point, 4,000 veterans were housed at that facility, but are now barred from entering it.

A Veteran Commits Suicide Every 80 Minutes-“More Vietnam veterans have committed suicide than the 55,000 who were killed in combat,” said Bob Filner, the 10-term congressman who capped the evening’s meeting. “The same is true for today’s two wars, which haven’t even completely ended.”

According to Filner, who is running to be San Diego’s mayor, “The official count is more than 5,000 service members killed and more than 40,000 wounded in the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. But more than 1 million veterans have come to the VA for help -— mostly with traumatic brain injuries. That’s not a rounding error.”

Compounding the problems veterans face is the difficult job market, as studies indicate a strong correlation between joblessness and suicide. [link]

Currently, for younger veterans aged 18 to 24, who have recently returned from Iraq and Afghanistan, their unemployment rate is 30.4%, [link] up from 18.4% a year earlier, compared to 15.3% for non veterans of the same age.

“When soldiers leave the military, they lose what service provides: purpose, focus, achievement, responsibility and…“belongingness,”” according to Peter D. Kramer, [link] a clinical professor of psychiatry at Brown University. “The workplace can be stressful, but especially for the mentally vulnerable, there is no substitute for what jobs offer in the way of structure, support and meaning.”

To deal with these issues, Filner had advocated for a GI Bill for the 21st Century to get today’s veterans into the workforce the way their fathers and grandfathers did after earlier wars.

“Millions of World War II veterans went to college on the GI Bill and millions more bought houses with VA loans. That created the middle class in America,” Filner said. “Why can’t we do the same thing for today’s veterans?”

Filner also said that, if elected mayor, he would open a veterans’ office right in city hall and advised the Veterans Affairs Department to grant relief to the 100,000 Vietnam veterans who have applied for Agent Orange care, rather than letting them die off, as seems to be the plan.
Pledging to focus the Veterans Caucus on jobs, housing, and homelessness this year, Caucus Chair Rick Reyes concluded the evening on a hopeful note.

But the outcome of the battle over the National Veterans Home in Brentwood will be a bellwether. If something good comes out of that controversy for veterans, we’ll know the meeting was worth the drive down to San Diego. If not, we’ll know it’s just more politicos running up to the microphone boasting how much they “support the troops.”

Until, you know, something else comes along.


(Dick Price is the editor LAProgressive.com where this piece was first posted.)
–cw

Tags: veterans, US veterans, Iraq veterans, Iraq war, end of war, after the war, homeless veterans, California veterans, Los Angeles Veterans, John Perez









CityWatch
Vol 10 Issue 15
Pub: Feb 21, 2012  

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