LA WATCHDOG--On Thursday morning, Mayor Eric Garcetti will deliver his State of the City address at City Hall where he will present his proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year beginning on July 1, 2017. And over the next two weeks, the Budget and Finance Committee headed by Paul Krekorian will conduct a review of the budget, even though the major points have already been negotiated behind closed doors.     

In California, elected officials at all levels of government are constantly complaining about the need for more money, even though we are one of the highest taxed states in the county.  At the same time, something is not right as we have the worst roads in the nation and vital services are being crowded out by ever increasing pension contributions.    

Over the past year, the tax burden for the four million Angelenos has ballooned by almost $1.6 billion.  This includes not only taxes initiated by Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City Council, but our proportionate share of numerous other taxes and fees dumped on us by the County, State, and other governmental entities.  This ding of $1.6 billion does not include the Soak the Rich income tax surcharge (Proposition 55) that would have added $700 million to the tab.  

Most of us do not recognize the enormity of these tax increases because they are spread over multiple jurisdictions.  They also come in many different shapes and forms: property taxes, parcel taxes, sales taxes, gasoline taxes, vehicle license fees, storm water taxes (aka the Rain Tax), income taxes, and a 20% tax on our DWP power bill.  

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For the average Angeleno, the $1.6 billion hit averages about $390 per person, or $1,560 for a family of four. 

To put it in a different perspective, if all these new levies were placed on our houses and apartments, our property taxes would balloon by almost 30%. 

Or if the $1.6 billion in new taxes were to be paid via the sales tax, it would soar to 11.4%. 

But wait, there’s more! 

The City, the County, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and State, are seriously considering an additional $2.7 billion in new taxes.  

This does not include any initiatives from the Los Angeles Unified School District. Nor does it include any direct taxes to pay for our share for the tens and tens of billions of the unfunded pension liabilities, although a good argument can be made that a portion of these new and contemplated taxes will indirectly fund our ever-increasing pension contributions.  

Combining the contemplated taxes with the 2016 and 2017 tax increases, the hit is $4.3 billion, or $1,100 for every Angeleno, $4,400 for a family of four and would result in a 16% sales tax (up over 80%), and an 80% bump in our property taxes. 

So, when our elected officials come pleading poor mouth, you know the not so proper response to these money grubbing, self-servicing politicians.  We are not your #*@^&+# ATM.   

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The following is a list of new taxes by jurisdiction which details our proportionate share.  They are followed by taxes that are being considered by the financial wizards who occupy City Hall, the County Hall of Administration, the AQMD, and the State Capitol.  You can also access the attached spread sheet for a one page summary.  

NEW TAXES 

City of Los Angeles (100%) 

Measure HHH – The $1.2 billion homeless bond that was approved by voters in November will cost us an average of $65 million a year for the next 30 years. 

DWP – The five year, $1 billion rate increase in our water and power rates that was approved by Mayor Garcetti and the City Council will provide the City with $150 million in tax revenue by 2021.  

Metro (40%) 

Measure M – The half cent increase in our sales tax that was approved in November is projected to raise $750 million a year. Our 40% share is $300 million. 

County (40%) 

Measure A – The parks parcel tax will raise about $100 million.  Our 40% share is $40 million. 

Measure H – The quarter cent increase in our sales tax that was approved in March will provide $375 million to fund services for the homeless. Our 40% share is $150 million. 

Los Angeles Community College District (75%) 

Measure CC – The $3.3 billion bond that was approved in November will cost us an average of $150 million over the next 30 years. 

State of California (10%) 

Measure 51 – Our share of the $9 billion educational facilities bond that was approved in November is $50 million a year for the next 30 years. 

Measure 56 – Our share of the $1.4 billion cigarette tax that was approved by the voters in November is $140 million a year. 

Gas Tax (SB 1 - The Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017) – Governor Jerry Brown recently approved the $5.2 billion a year increase in the gas tax and vehicle license fees. We are on the hook for $520 million a year.  

TAXES UNDER CONSIDERATION 

City (100%) 

Street Bond – The Measure M Local Return revenue from Metro and the funds allocated to local governments in the new Gas Tax reduced the street repair bond to $2 billion from $4.5 billion.  This will cost us $120 million for the next 30 years. 

The Affordable Housing Linkage Fee will raise an estimated $100 million a year from new residential and commercial developments. This fee will eventually flow through to us as there is no such thing as a free lunch. 

County (40%) 

Stormwater Tax – The County is considering a Rain Tax (“God created rain and you figured out how to tax it.”) to finance a $20 billion storm water capture plan over the next 20 years.  Our share will be $400 million a year. 

South Coast Air Quality Management District (25%) 

The SCAQMD is discussing an increase in the vehicle license fee of $30, raising an estimated $300 million.  This money will fund smog reduction programs in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties.  Our share will be an estimated $75 million.  

State (10%) 

Sales Tax - Senator Bob Hertzberg is pushing to expand the sales tax to include services.  Our share of the $10 billion increase will be $1 billion. 

Split Roll – Property taxes on commercial and manufacturing property would be based on market value and not on the values established under Proposition 13.  Our share of this $10 billion tax haul will be $1 billion. 

UC Bonds – The State is considering asking the voters to approve a $2 billion bond to finance facilities for the University of California and the California State University systems. Our share will be $12 million a year for the next 30 years. 

Park Bonds – The State is also considering placing a measure on the ballot to raise $3 billion to pay for the repair of the neglected State Parks.  Our share will be $18 million a year for the next 30 years. 

The creative geniuses that are responsible for our Structural Deficits, our lunar cratered streets and failing bridges, and tens of billions in unfunded pension liabilities will no doubt create other schemes to pick our pockets. They will select a hot button issue that appeals to our sympathies that has been underfunded because they are not willing to prioritize their spending, preferring to answer the demands of the campaign funding leaders of the City’s public unions. 

Tax Angeles … to be continued!  Unfortunately!

 (Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate.  Jack is affiliated with Recycler Classifieds -- www.recycler.com.  He can be reached at:  lajack@gmail.com.)

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LA WATCHDOG--Pension and postretirement benefits have slammed the finances of IBEW Local 18, the union that represents more than 90% of the employees of our Department of Water and Power.  Over the last five years, the liability for postretirement benefit obligations has tripled, increasing by $4 million to $5.9 million.  At the same time, the net worth of Local 18 has taken a 70% hit, declining by almost $5 million, from $7.1 million to only $2.2 million.  

While dues from members has grown by $1.4 million (17%) to almost $10 million (1.25% of salaries) since 2011, increased costs for pensions and postretirement benefits have contributed to annual losses, including a ding of $1.6 million in 2016. 

All this makes for a very nice pension plan for IBEW Union Bo$$ d’Arcy, the Local 18’s long time business manager.  But if you talk to his members, they are not complaining about his generous compensation or his rich retirement package.  To the contrary, they believe he has earned every cent given what he has accomplished for his more than 8,000 members who enjoy above average wages and benefits.  

Over the years, the IBEW Labor Premium has been estimated to be in the range of $200 to $250 million.  This does not include the impact of overly restrictive work rules and burdensome staffing requirements.  

The key to Union Bo$$ d’Arcy’s success is that he has enjoyed the support of many members of the City Council who have benefitted from his generous campaign contributions.  He has also intimidated those who would dare to oppose his contract demands.  Just ask Bernard Parks who barely beat an incompetent opponent who was bankrolled by the IBEW in 2011.  

The undue influence of Union Bo$$ d’Arcy is why we must insist on an open and transparent discussion of the ongoing labor negotiations between DWP and the IBEW.  While personnel costs now exceed $1.5 billion, there are many other issues besides wages, healthcare benefits, and pensions that need to be addressed.  These include overtime, outsourcing, work rules, staffing levels, benchmarking of operations, training (especially after the recent audit of Controller Ron Galperin), and the Joint Training and Safety Institutes.  

As suggested by the Los Angeles Times, there needs to be public hearings that lay out the expectations and goals of the Department and the City and their impact on Ratepayers.  These hearings should also disclose the status of the current negotiations as the existing contract expires on September 30. 

We should also be informed on a timely basis (say 24 hours) of any offers and counter offers made by either party during the negotiations.  

The cost of all offers or proposals should be analyzed by a qualified independent third party who, unlike the City Administrative Officer and the Chief Legislative Analyst, is free from political pressure.   

All communications between the participants and their staffs must also be disclosed on a timely basis.  

Finally, there must be adequate time for a “full and public analysis” of the contract before it is placed on the agenda of the City Council.  

In the past, we have been presented with a “done deal” that is automatically approved by the City Council and Mayor without any real input from Ratepayers who are paying the bill.  In this era of political upheaval and uncertainty, now is the time for our Elected Elite to endorse reform and implement an open and transparent process in labor negotiations that will help restore our trust and confidence in City Hall and the Department of Water and Power.  

A little sunshine never hurt anyone.

(Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate.  Jack is affiliated with Recycler Classifieds -- www.recycler.com.  He can be reached at:  lajack@gmail.com.)

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LA WATCHDOG--Contrary to the recommendation of Controller Ron Galperin, the Los Angeles City Council passed a resolution on Wednesday approving the issuance of up to $60 million of Judgment Obligation Bonds.  The net proceeds will be used to replenish the City’s Reserve Fund that has been the source of the cash needed to pay for a slew of lost law suits that far exceeded the $68 million in the City’s budget. 

Under this plan to fatten up the Reserve Fund, the City will be on the hook for annual payments of almost $8 million for the next ten years, a total of $80 million.  This includes approximately $20 million in interest payments to wealthy California investors who love double tax exempt bonds, money that the City could devote to priorities such as our streets and sidewalks, Vision Zero (safe streets), or the homeless.  

This annual payment of $8 million is in addition to the $9 million payment associated with the $50 million of Judgment Obligation Bonds issued in 2010 to fund, in part, the legal payments involving the May Day demonstrations in and around McArthur Park in 2007.  

Galperin, on the other hand, recommends that the City save $20 million in interest expense by forgoing the issuance of the Judgment Obligation Bonds.  He proposes to restore the balance of the Reserve Fund to a level above the targeted threshold amount of $279 million (an amount equal to 5% of the General fund revenue) by sweeping unspent departmental funds at year end into the Reserve Fund. 

Financing everyday operating expenses (including legal judgments) and the Structural Deficit with long term debt is a fool’s solution that is embraced by Paul Krekorian, the Chair of the Budget and Finance Committee of the City Council.  Not only is it poor financial policy, it burdens the next generation with the sins of the past.  

At the City Council, Krekorian argued that it was prudent for the City to preserve the option to issue the Judgment Obligation Bonds because of the great uncertainties facing the City.  These include projected budget deficits, revenue shortfalls, pressure on the Reserve Fund, a downturn in the economy, less money from Washington, a downgrade by the rating agencies, an adverse stock market, and a lowering of the investment rate assumption for the City’s two pension funds.  

But this argument of preserving the City’s options is pure baloney.  When City Hall smells new sources of cash, it is full speed ahead.  There is no more dangerous place than standing between the members of the City Council and new cash for the General Fund unless it is between them and campaign contributions from real estate developers. 

The Judgment Obligations Bonds would not have been necessary if Krekorian and his Budget and Finance Committee had followed the recommendation of the City Administrative Officer to increase the Liability Claims budget to $120 million, a number approximating the prior year’s expenditure of $110 million, almost a double of the budgeted $68 million.  

If the Krekorian and the Budget and Finance Committee had been true stewards of the City’s treasury and our money, they would not have needlessly diverted $213 million from the Reserve Fund to the General Fund over the last three years to pay for everyday operating expenses.  After all, revenues during this three-year period increased by almost $600 million. 

If the Reserve Fund had not been raided, its balance would be almost $500 million, negating the need for any Judgment Obligation Bonds. 

Krekorian also said that the lowering of the investment rate assumption for the City’s pension plans would be a “disserve to the public” because it would increase the City’s pension contributions by hundreds of millions.  But that begs the question of how he proposes to eliminate the City’s unfunded pension liability that is estimated by Moody’s Investor Services to be more than $20 billion. 

But it is Krekorian and his Budget and Finance Committee that are doing a “disservice to the public” by continuing to kick the budget can down our lunar cratered streets and broken sidewalks.  We have rivers of red ink, Structural Deficits, massively underfunded pension plans, and some of the worst streets in the nation. 

As a first step in reforming our City’s finances, deep six the Judgment Obligation Bonds and save us $20 million. 

And then Krekorian and his Budget and Finance Committee need to develop a long term plan that will require the City to Live Within Its Means. Is that too much to ask of the highest paid City Council in the country?

(Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate.  Jack is affiliated with Recycler Classifieds -- www.recycler.com.  He can be reached at:  lajack@gmail.com.)

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LA WATCHDOG--The City Administrative Officer’s Third Financial Status Report dated March 16 paints a bleak picture of the City’s finances, including the previous sacrosanct Reserve Fund.  

For the current year, the City is looking at a $57 million deficit.  But this does not take into consideration the strong probability of lower revenues from property and sales taxes, taxes on DWP Ratepayers (the 10% Utility Users’ Tax and the illegal 8% Transfer Tax), departmental fees from the City’s proprietary departments and special funds, parking fines, and franchise fees.  These dings more than offset the growth in the hotel tax and the documentary transfer tax. 

The Report also indicates that next year’s budget gap is anticipated to be $224 million.  But even this projection for the fiscal year beginning on July 1 may be understated because of lower than anticipated revenues and the demand for increased services.  

One of the culprits in this year’s deficit is the explosion in legal liabilities as the City is anticipating spending $147 million in settlements and judgments, almost $80 million more than the budgeted liability of $68 million.  To cover these higher than anticipated losses, the City is hitting up the Reserve Fund for over $60 million. 

Unfortunately, the Reserve Fund no longer has a surplus that can be tapped unless it is a true emergency.  As of January 31, the Reserve Fund had dipped slightly below the minimum threshold of $279 million, an amount equal to 5% of General Fund revenues of $5.576 billion. 

To replenish the Reserve Fund, the City is pursuing the issuance of $70 million of Judgment Obligation Bonds.  But ev en with this infusion, the Reserve Fund may not be able to absorb this year’s losses, especially if revenues are lower than budgeted.  

This will also preclude the Mayor and the City Council from raiding the Reserve Fund.  

Over the last three years, the Mayor and the City Council have siphoned off $213 million from the Reserve Fund without blinking an eye.  

But were these financial transactions necessary given that City revenues have increased by $900 million over the last four years? 

Why did the Budget and Finance Committee chaired by Paul Krekorian permit this transfer from the Reserve Fund?  

Why did the Budget and Finance Committee allocate only $68 million for legal liabilities when the City Administrative Officer recommended a significantly higher amount? 

If the Reserve Fund had the $213 million that was drained from its accounts, the balance of our rainy-day fund would be almost $500 million, or 8.8% of the General Fund revenues. 

And if you toss in the Budget Stabilization Fund of $94 million, total reserves increase to $585 million, or a very healthy 10.5% of General Fund revenues, exceeding the 10% level recommended by Miguel Santana, our previous CAO.  

This is another case where the politically motivated spending policies of our Elected Elite trumped the long-term interests of the City.  This is reminiscent of their failure to fund the repair and maintenance of our lunar cratered streets, our broken sidewalks, and the rest of our deteriorating infrastructure; their unwillingness to engage in real pension reform; and their approval of budget busting labor contracts. 

We cannot trust Mayor Garcetti, the City Council, and the Budget and Finance Committee with our money.  

We need an independent Office of Transparency and Accountability to oversee the City’s finances and protect us from the Mayor and the City Council pursuing short term political goals that are not in the best long-term interests of the City and all Angelenos.

(Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate.  Jack is affiliated with Recycler Classifieds -- www.recycler.com.  He can be reached at:  lajack@gmail.com.)

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LA WATCHDOG--While the City of Los Angeles has some of the worst streets in the country, there is no plan to repair and maintain our 6,500 miles of streets and 900 miles of alleys because of the lack of sufficient funding as pension contributions and other personnel costs have devoured the City’s budget.  Rather, the City is bouncing from pot hole to pot hole, filing cracks with slurry, and ignoring the one-third of our streets that are in a failed condition. 

In 2014, the Save Our Streets LA plan indicated that the City needed approximately $4 billion over the next twenty years to restore our network of streets to good working order.  But in 2014, there was not the political will to place a half cent increase in our sales tax on the ballot, especially after the Controller’s audit of Street Services exposed a very inefficient department. 

But now the City has two new sources of cash to fund the repair and maintenance of our streets and alleys. 

Last week, the State passed a new transportation bill that will generate $52 billion over the next ten years from higher gasoline and diesel fuel taxes and increased vehicle license fees.  Under the local return provisions of this legislation, the City anticipates receiving $100 million a year or $1 billion over the next ten years. 

In November, the voters approved Measure M, the half cent increase in our sales tax to fund Metro’s ever increasing operating losses and its ambitious expansion plans.  This measure provides that local governments will share in 17% of the revenue based on their share of the County’s population.  Under this plan, the City will receive $56 million next year and $700 million over the next ten years based on Metro’s projections.  

Over the next 40 years, the Measure M Local Return revenue to the City is projected to be $5.1 billion. 

The Save Our Streets LA plan may also benefit from stricter oversight of the Local Return revenue from Measure R, the half cent increase in our sales tax that was approved by the voters in 2008.  While the Local Return revenue is expected to be $45 million this year, only half of that revenue was allocated to Street Services as the City diverted $15 million to the General Fund and $8 million to the Department of Transportation. 

Over the next 10 years, the Measure R Local Return revenue is expected to be over $600 million and $5 billion over the next 40 years. 

The City also received Local Return revenue of $128 million this year from Proposition A (approved by the voters in 1980) and Proposition C (approved by the voters in 1990).  But true to form, the City diverted 21% of this Local Return revenue to the General Fund while less than 10% made it to Street Services.  

Well maintained streets are vital to the City’s economy and to the orderly flow of traffic.  But they are not a budget priority for the Mayor or the City Council as funding for Street Services has been neglected while General Fund revenues have increased by $1 billion over the last four years.  

But now that the City has the resources from the State and Metro, it is time to go Back to Basics and make the repair and maintenance of our lunar cratered streets and alleys a Priority Outcome.  

Our City needs a network of efficient and well maintained streets, especially if we want to be a showcase to the world when we host the Olympics in 2024.

(Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate.  Jack is affiliated with Recycler Classifieds -- www.recycler.com.  He can be reached at:  lajack@gmail.com.)

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LA WATCHDOG--The City of Los Angeles is considering the issuance of $60 million in Judgment Obligation Bonds to replenish the City’s Reserve Fund.  This rainy-day fund has been depleted to pay for legal settlements that were significantly more than the budgeted liability of $68 million, a level considerably below the amount recommended by the City Administrative Officer last year.  

Per the CAO, the Reserve Fund is slightly below the targeted policy level of $279 million, an amount equal to 5% of the budgeted General Fund revenue. The infusion of $60 million would increase the balance in this account to over 6% of the General Fund, giving the Reserve Fund additional flexibility to meet unexpected expenditures or emergencies. 

Of course, the issuance of Judgment Obligations Bonds would not have been necessary if the Mayor and the Budget and Finance Committee led by Paul Krekorian had not siphoned off $213 million over the last three up-revenue years from this emergency fund to pay for every day operating expenses. If these funds had not been diverted, we would have had a very healthy Reserve Fund with a balance of $490 million, or 8.8% of General Fund revenue. 

On March 2, the City Administrative Officer recommended that the City Council, subject to approval by the Mayor, authorize the issuance of up to $60 million in bonds.  

You can almost see the City Hall gang rubbing their hands together in anticipation of this infusion of cash. 

But on March 23, Controller Ron Galperin threw a wet blanket on the City Council’s plans as he delivered a two-page letter where he recommended that the City NOT proceed with the Judgment Obligation Bond at this time. 

His logic was very simple.  Galperin stated that “debt financing of liability claims should only be used in extraordinary circumstances and in times of great need.  This year does not meet those criteria, and the City should live within its means instead of borrowing unnecessarily.” He also added that the City should “avoid short term solutions to long term problems.” 

Bravo! 

In addition, the City would avoid paying $20 million in interest expense over the next ten years by not issuing the bonds.  

Galperin also stated that the Reserve Fund will benefit from unspent departmental funds at year end that will be swept into the fund, allowing it to exceed its minimum policy levels by $10 million. 

More than likely, the City will NOT follow Galperin’s recommendation as the infusion of new cash is just too tempting for our politicians.    

The City Administrative Officer will support the issuance of the bonds to bolster the depleted Reserve Fund, especially if this year’s revenues are lower than budgeted (which may well be the case).  This is a reasonable request and strategy.  

However, we cannot trust Garcetti and the City Council as once they smell the cash, they will want to raid the Reserve Fund, once again, to pay for every day operating expenses.  

The City Council will consider the issuance of the Judgment Obligation Bonds on Tuesday, April 4.  We will need to be prepared for the members of the City Council to demonstrate their financial acumen as they tell us how they are willing to make the tough decision to issue the bonds, recognizing that the bonds are a necessary evil.  But do not expect the City Council to put any restrictions on its ability to tap into this new honey pot of cash.    

Bring your hip boots as the sewer known as City Hall will be overflowing.  

And a genuine thank you to Controller Ron Galperin for his willingness to speak the truth and be … the skunk at the garden party. 

(Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate.  Jack is affiliated with Recycler Classifieds -- www.recycler.com.  He can be reached at:  lajack@gmail.com.)

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LA WATCHDOG--Mayor Eric Garcetti is proposing to close part of the City’s $250 million budget gap for next year by using an estimated $50 million of Local Return money from Measure M, the permanent half cent increase in our sales tax that was approved by 71% of voters in November

While the bulk of the proceeds of this new tax are to be used to finance Metro’s ambitious capital expenditure program and its money losing operations, 17% of the proceeds are designated for “Local Return.” Under this program, funds are returned to the cities based on their population for the communities’ “eligible transportation related uses.”  These transportation needs include “transit, streets and roads, storm drains, Green Streets, Active Transportation Projects, Complete Streets, public transit access to recreational facilities, Transit Oriented Community Investments, and other unmet transit needs.” 

Importantly, these Local Return funds are meant to supplement existing programs and not to free up money for the General Fund and other programs. In other words, they are not to be used for deficit reduction. 

In recent interviews and during the campaign to pass Measure M, Garcetti said that these Measure M Local Return funds were to be used to fix, pave, or repair our streets.  

In the upcoming year, the Local Return from Measure M is expected to be about $50 million.  And over the next 40 years, the total haul is projected to be in the range of $5 billion based on Metro’s projections. 

The infusion of these Local Return funds represents an excellent opportunity to jump start the development and implementation of a comprehensive plan to repair and maintain our 28,000 lane miles of streets, considered to some of the worst in the country, and 900 miles of alleys.  A well-conceived long term plan will also go a long way in relieving congestion, the worst in the developed world per a recent article in The New York Times. 

The City’s current street repair program, dubbed the pothole patrol plan, is not working.  While City Hall tells us that the status of our streets has improved slightly because Street Services is budgeted to pave or repair 2,400 miles of roads this year, most Angelenos believe, based on experience, especially after the rains, that our streets have continued to deteriorate.  Furthermore, the pothole patrol plan neglects the more than one third of our streets that are rated D and F, meaning that they need to be either resurfaced or reconstructed, all at great expense. 

If the City combines the resources of the Local Return funds with the current expenditures of the Street Services and Transportation devoted to our roads, it can develop and implement a street repair program that over the next twenty years will make our streets some of the best in the nation.  

Now that is Back to Basics. Forget the photo-ops. Keep your promises. Fix LA’s streets!

(Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate.  Jack is affiliated with Recycler Classifieds -- www.recycler.com.  He can be reached at:  lajack@gmail.com.)

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